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Blog

Filtering by Tag: Pilot

Today's Tools - 7/28/15

Fr. Kyle Sanders

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It is often the case that I'm using different tools for different projects or for different tasks. So I thought occasionally I would share them with you.  

I'm working on a retreat this weekend and also preparing for some things for the altar servers for this next school year. So my space today has been at my offic desk, which admittedly isn't the cleanest. 

As is mostly the case, I have my Bullet Journal out to remind me to stay on task and to remind me what else I need to get done for the day. I have repurposed a Christian Art Publishers 2015 Executive Planner that I got for Christmas from my parents who had my name embossed on the leatherette cover. I'm pretty much ignoring the format and using it as a regular notebook. 

I have a Paperstax pocket notebook in my One Star Leather cover. I've been using the notebook to, well, take various notes, map some stuff out, and draft an email to the altar servers. I used my new bamboo Pilot Vanishing Point which has a Hebrew/Architect grind courtesy of Shawn Newton via Vanness Pens. The VP is inked with that loud Liberty's Elysium.  

I had to some calendar things and check a PDF so I had my iPad 2 out.  

Lastly I have my brand new Betabook, which was a Kickstarter project turning a white marker board into a portable book-like format. I am loving it so far. It's perfect for brainstorming or quickly working out problems and ideas. It's also very easy to photograph so I can connect the pictures to Evernote for reference later. I'm using the blue and black markers it came with, which were made by German company Neuland. You'll also notice a Nock Co. Lookout which holds the Neuland markers. 

 What have you used today?

NANOWRIMO Materials

Fr. Kyle Sanders

For the past two years, I have taken part in a writing phenomenon called NaNoWriMo, National Novel Writing Month. Started in San Francisco about 10 years ago, this event is intended to force the hand of the wanna-be novelist. The goal is to write 50,000 words during the span of the month of November. It is a whirlwind of creativity. That number, seemingly arbitrary, is about the length of a short novel. Although it might only be the prologue of a George R.R. Martin novel, writing that amount is quite a feat (one which I have failed at two years running).

Most take on this endeavor with word processor and keyboard, but, as a pen person, I can't pass up the opportunity to use my toys. The last two years I have dedicated a pen, pad, and ink to this particular end. My Lamy 2000 and TWSBI Vac 700, both in fine nibs, together wrote 30,000 words (mind you that's 70,000 short of what they should have written), 10k and 20k respectively. The two previous years I used large 8 1/2 x 11 notebooks from Moleskine and Leuchtturm 1917.

My lineup this year is heavy on my Dallas Pen Show purchases. As with the two previous pens, I wanted something with a large ink capacity and a small nib. My Franklin-Christoph Model 02 Intrinsic with Masuyama Needlepoint fits the bill. I can fill it as an eye-dropper with Iroshizuku Kon-Peki, and it'll hopefully write for days without needing filling. It will be kept snug and safe in my Bas & Lokes "Reynolds" Leather pen case.

I decided to go with a smaller notebook this year because those large notebooks were too unwieldy for me and weren't a delight to write in. The Zequenz 360° lined notebook in A5 size is perfect. It can supposedly bend any which way, and it has 400 pages to take in all 50,000 words (hopefully). I've been using a pocket sized version of the notebook for the novel prep, and I've been enjoying the paper.

Now that I've gotten all my material you're probably wondering the topic of my novel. Well, I'm not writing a novel per se but a work of theology and philosophy of utmost seriousness. I hope to expound on the theology of alcohol. 

I do hope to incorporate my blog writing both here and elsewhere into the word count (a little bit of a cheater, but I'm still writing 50,000 words!), but my posting frequency might lessen some due to output elsewhere. 

Pens - How I Let Things Flow

Fr. Kyle Sanders

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For two years or so, I have gone from full on digital guru amongst my friends to the largest proponent of analog gear. It started with my first fountain pen, then a second, then a third. My equipment continued to grow so much so that is seemed obvious for me to begin sharing my experience of these writing tools. 

It seems appropriate that, before I continue with other topics like reviews or other creative endeavors, I share should with you how I use my pens paper, and ink on a daily basis. Today, I will start with my fountain scribal workflow. 

1) My Daily Carry

This has different connotations in different areas of the internet world. For me, it is the two pens that are always with me, sitting in my breast pocket ready to be used at a moment's notice. 

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Around the time I started in regular ministry as a priest two years ago, I started carrying around a fountain pen in my pocket. For about a year that was just one pen, the Monteverde Jewelria Mini, with a fine nib. I lost one and purchased another and lost it as well. It still is one of my favorite pens, but I couldn't stand losing another so I haven't purchased a third. For nearly a year now, I have been rotating my daily carry fountain pen. 

I have a few requirements for this particular pen in my scribal workflow. First, it must have a fine nib because my normal handwriting is small, and the fine nib works well on all assortment of paper, qualities good and bad. Second, it needs to be durable. I don't want a pen in my pocket that can't handle an accidental fall. Thirdly, it needs to be insulated. What I mean by that is in the South and due to my body heat a pen close to my chest can evaporate into the cap the water component of the ink, leaving the dye alone in the feed, which make things difficult to clean. Pens with cartridge converters or sacs are preferred over piston fillers. Finally, it can't be too large because some the clerical shirt manufacturers make shallow breast pockets making it difficult to hold something like a TWSBI VAC 700.

About eight months ago, I was convicted by someone (I don't remember who) that fountain pens are not the best in all situations. So I began carrying either a ballpoint, rollerball, or gel ink pen in my shirt pocket as well. This leaves me with two pens on me at anytime for any occasion. 

Currently using - Lamy AL Star Fine Nib  with Lamy Choral and Retro 51 Tornado Eisenhower

2) Homily Prep

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I have one pen that is never rotated and is always in use. That is my Sheaffer Triumph Desk Pen. I purchased it on eBay for a steal of $30. It has a gold nib and write a fine somewhat boxy line. I use it as my main creative instrument as I'm preparing my homilies. It takes down all my thoughts and seems to organize them in a cogent pattern. It is definitely one of my favorite pens, and so is always in use. 

3) Desk Pen

This describes not a species of pen, as above, but rather its use. This pen rotates as ink is used up (I don't like to waste ink.) It's role in my scribal workflow (sorry, I love that phrase!) is to man all normal pen duties at my desk: signing checks, free-writing, Bullet Journaling, brainstorming, note taking, letter writing. 

Currently using - Edison Collier Medium Nib with P.W. Akkerman Hopjesbruin

4) Thank You Pen

I am very grateful to have generous parishioners, and so I find myself regularly writing thank you notes. That regularity seemed to warrant a dedicated pen. This role requires a stub or italic nib for pretty characters. 

Currently Using - Online Calligraphy Pen .8 mm Stub with J. Herbin Perle Noir
From left to right: Edison Nouveau Premier, Bülow X-30, Edison Collier, Online Calligraphy

From left to right: Edison Nouveau Premier, Bülow X-30, Edison Collier, Online Calligraphy

5) Meeting Pen

As in any office, I have meetings. I like the idea of assigning a separate pen to take notices within a meeting. This separates and highlights the notes within my Bullet Journal and of course it gives me the opportunity to ink up another pen. 

Currently Using - Edison Nouveau Premiere 2014 Summer Edition Fine Nib with J. Herbin Rose Cyclamen

6) Delivery Pen

As a priest, I'm preaching often. I have found that handwriting my homilies helps me to remember the flow of the homily as well as helping my internalize how I want to say each sentence. I usually deliver the homily from a full written text, as opposed to an outline. One of the important things in that regard is readability, so I write larger characters than I normally would. To help make those characters pop out I use a broad or sub nib. Because of this, one of the most important things I do end up looking the best with those big, bold lines. 

Currently using - Bülow X-30 Fine Nib with Franklin-Christoph Black Magic (yeah, I know, a fine nib, but that FC ink spreads so wide it turns the fine nib to a broad.)

7) Computer/Phone Pen

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I'm blessed to have two desk in my office. One is dedicated to normal everyday work and the other hold the later technology, the phone and my laptop with its accessories. I have a notebook dedicated to my notes from phone messages and notes take from whatever I'm doing on my computer, and a notebook always needs a pen. For over a year, my Carbonesque Pilot Vanishing Point stayed here, that is until I let a bride use it without proper caution and the nib wasn't the same (yes, that's the pen I had Mr. Masuyama work on at the Dallas Pen Show). Now I rotate when ink runs out.

Currently using: Yellow Vanishing Point Fine Nib with Aurora Black
The Visconti is to the right of the G-2

The Visconti is to the right of the G-2

8) Home Office Pen

Most of my fountain pens remain in my work office, but I assign a pen a month at a time to reign as my home fountain pen. It is used all over the house, but sits at my desk. 

Currently using: Visconti Rembrandt Medium Nib with Montblanc Alfred Hitchcock

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9) School Pens

I have a third office at the high school where I have been assigned as chaplain. Last year, I dedicated two pens each with one of the school colors (yellow and green) to that office. 

Pelikan M215 Green Demonstrator Fine Nib and Mandarin Parker Urban 125th Anniversary Medium Nib

Written with:

Esterbrook J 9556 Nib with Sheaffer #42 Washable Blue

Sheaffer Calligraphy Pen Medium Italic with Sheaffer Blue/Black

Waterford Eclipse Medium Nib with Mix of Sailor Jentle Blue and Chesterfield Ruby

Zebra Sarasa Clip .3mm Red


Dallas Pen Show - Day 2

Fr. Kyle Sanders

Me and Ms. Vanness hiding behind the Akkerman

Me and Ms. Vanness hiding behind the Akkerman

I didn't think it could get any better than day one, but now that I had scoped out everything. I made a game plan for day two. 

- visit the Edelstein's, whom I had met the night before

- get a Ryan Krusac pen. 

- bid on Retro 51's in the auction

- if the budget allows, get a Shawn Newton pen

I started the day with my Hawaiian shirted buddy. He had sold one of his nice pens and had already replaced it with a gorgeous Visconti Divina. He allowed me to test the nib and try out a pen, that for me at least, would be out of the question. It reminded me however of the day before. I had spotted another grail pen of mine, the Visconti Homo Sapiens Crystal. He and I got to talking about that pen, about Visconti Dreamtouch Nibs, and he let me know that our now mutual friend Lisa Vanness had one in stock at her store in Little Rock. The pen costed a bit more than the Dolce Vita, but I decided it would be worth the extra expense, because I probably wouldn't get one otherwise. After our conversation (he might have sold me on it) I was determined to get the Crystal. 

Geha (right) Sheaffer (left)

Geha (right) Sheaffer (left)

On my way to Lisa, I stopped by the Edelstein's table. The elder took me through their bargain boxes and I found three pens for $60. One was for a friend (can't reveal that because he hasn't received it yet). One was an old Sheaffer Calligraphy pen, and the final was a lesser know German pen called Geha, who made neat little piston filler pens. All three pens were great little buys. The Geha is surprisingly smooth. The Edelstein's bread and butter, though, were vintage Parkers in good condition. I haven't reached that level of collector. 

dallasvisconticrystal

I moved from them to Ms. Vanness. The previous day was a good day for her, and overnight her husband had driven from Little Rock to deliver more ink. They are the only American retailer of P.W. Akkerman ink and people flock to her to get the bottles before they're sold out. She confirmed that she had the pen at the store and ... I bought it. I actually bought it. I never though I would go for such an expensive pen, but I found myself giving her my money. I got a bottle of Diamine Mediterranean Blue to compliment the pen. The ink would be the celebratory ink of a new stage in the fountain pen journey. I'm afraid this might have opened a door to getting a Nakaya. 

Unfortunately, that purchase ruled out the possibility of a getting one of Shawn Newton's pens. However, he had this really cool pen that was mostly black, with a marbled black and white grip that brought you a nice surprise when you uncapped the pen. I told him if he could get a yellow and black material I would buy that pen. So, hopefully, if you continue reading, you will eventually see that on the blog. 

I had already made up my mind to get a pen from Ryan Krusac. Ryan, from the Atlanta area, turns pens made of rare woods and of harvested naturally shed elk antler. The elk antler pens were especially beautiful due to the scrimshaw work in them. Over the two days, Ryan and I shared some things about our lives, and we even had a connection of a particular crater lake north of Lake Granada in Nicaragua, that for him held special significance. We have some good conversations about mission trips. The first day, there were three of his pens that stuck out to me. I told him I would sleep on it. The one I decided on was the scrimshaw one depicting a ship in a tempest, which reminded me of Scripture and the Sea of Galilee. It has a good weight to it due to the metalware but as I quickly found out it suffers the smudge of inky fingers, so I will have to be very careful with it. It is definitely a display pen, but I don't buy a pen that won't be used. 

KrusacDallas

Ryan came to the show accompanied by his best friend, who is a chocolatier. He paired some of his chocolates with some of Ryan's pens. Although I didn't go that route, he had some delicious flavors of chocolate: French Roast Coffee (which brought me back home in an instant), Irish Stout (it felt like biting into Guinness), and Mango with chili pepper. I definitely got some. 

I ended my floor purchasing at the Anderson's. I wanted some silicone grease to convert the Franklin-Christoph to an eyedropper. I had also eyed a notebook on their table I could use for NANOWRIMO this year that had nearly 400 pages. It's an Italian company called 360° and supposedly it can be bended every which way. I will definitely put it through the ringer in November. Finally, at the very beginning of the show, while the Anderson's were still setting up, I noticed one of the new pens from Pilot, the pocket pen E95. I love pocket pens and at the price with a gold Pilot nib I couldn't pass it up. 

You might notice there was one thing left on my original list, a special edition Retro 51. Retro didn't have any on display at their table, but they did donate two to the silent auction which benefited the Dallas Pen Club and the continuation of the show. One was an old Retro 51 Abbondanza. The appeal of this pen was its box which is made of bamboo and displays the pen nicely when opened. The other pen was a special edition of 200 pieces the Double 8. It has a gold trim and tortoiseshell celluloid with eight facets. It seems to me very Omas-like, and definitely fits Retro 51's slogan "Life is too short to carry an ugly pen." I was able, with some bid lurking, to win both pens. All in all, I felt my first show was a success. I got some pens, but more importantly I made some new friends.

The whole quarry. The Abbondanza is on the left. The Double 8 is on the top. The E60 is on the bottom. 

The whole quarry. The Abbondanza is on the left. The Double 8 is on the top. The E60 is on the bottom.